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Entries in Mason [David] (19)

Saturday
Feb252012

A Model Ghetto

2010 | boychoir/mezzo-soprano/tenor/clarinet/violin/cello and piano

Libretto by David Mason

From the Vedem oratorio

To purchase the mp3 from Amazon, featuring The Northwest Boychoir and Music of Remembrance, please click here

Friday
Feb242012

Beyond All Price — Hester’s Lullaby

2008 | soprano/piano

Libretto by David Mason

From The Scarlet Letter

At the end of Act One, Scene Two of The Scarlet Letter, Hester is alone in her jail cell with her sleeping baby, having just been confronted by her estranged husband, whom she had until that day assumed was dead. This is the moment when her love for her daughter, Pearl, overwhelms her, and she vows to do everything in her power, despite the morality of her community and her husband’s desire for revenge, to protect and nurture her child.

— David Mason

Friday
Feb242012

Come To The Devil’s Fire — Mistress Hibbons’ (The Witch) aria

2008 | mezzo-soprano/piano

From The Scarlet Letter

Libretto by David Mason

Act One, Scene Four of The Scarlet Letter finds Arthur Dimmesdale sharing rooms with Roger Chillingworth, who has come to suspect Dimmesdale of adultery. Chillingworth leaves to attend to the dying governor, and when Dimmesdale awakes from a drug- induced sleep he wanders alone out into the streets, tortured by his own guilt. There he meets Mistress Hibbons, who sees the hypocrisy in the young minister, sees that he has hidden behind his pious image and even distanced himself from his own identity. In this song she taunts the minister—a sort of grotesque mirror of his guilt. — David Mason

Saturday
Feb252012

Hear My Story Now

2010 | boychoir/mezzo-soprano/tenor/clarinet/violin/cello and piano

From the Vedem oratorio

Libretto by David Mason

Saturday
Feb252012

Home Number One

2010 | boychoir/clarinet/violin/cello and piano. Also available for boychoir (or children’s choir) and piano

From the Vedem oratorio and the Vedem choral excerpt cycle

Libretto by David Mason

Saturday
Feb252012

In Terezin The Mind Was Free

2010 | boychoir/clarinet/violin/cello/piano. Also available for boychoir (or children’s choir) and piano

From the Vedem oratorio and the Vedem choral excerpt cycle

Libretto by David Mason

Saturday
Feb252012

Like Leaves About To Fall

2010 | boychoir/tenor/clarinet/violin/cello and piano

From the Vedem oratorio

Libretto by David Mason

Sunday
Mar062011

Ludlow

David Mason and I have begun work on our second opera together, based on his verse-novel Ludlow. In 2009, David received the $40,000 Thatcher Hoffman Smith Award for Creativity in Motion, awarded by The University of Oklahoma. The prize was given to David specifically to create the libretto for our 2nd opera together.

We are thrilled that The University of Colorado’s New Opera Works program, run by Leigh Holman, will workshop Act I of Ludlow in June 2012 in Boulder, CO. Beth Greenberg will direct. For more information, please click here.

Friday
Feb242012

Now Truly Know Me — Chillingworth’s Lament

2008 | baritone/piano

From The Scarlet Letter

Libretto by David Mason

In Act One, scene two of The Scarlet Letter, Hester is found in her jail cell, having just been publicly accused of adultery. Her estranged husband, now calling himself Roger Chillingworth, enters the jail as a doctor to offer assistance to her ailing baby. As the two begin to recognize each other, Chillingworth sings of their past, betraying a vulnerability he will later quell when, in a spirit of frustrated rage, he will seek revenge for Hester’s adultery. — David Mason

Friday
Feb242012

Our Eden Here is Love — Hester and Arthur Dimmesdale’s love duet

2008 | soprano/tenor/piano

From The Scarlet Letter

Libretto by David Mason

In Act Two, Scene One of The Scarlet Letter, Hester wanders into the forest outside Boston, knowing she might run into her lover, Arthur Dimmesdale. For years the two have kept their love secret, allowing Arthur to remain a Minister in their community, and Hester has borne the guilt for their adultery alone. Now that their guilt secret is in danger of being revealed, neither of them seems willing to live any more with the lie. Meeting in the forest, far from the laws and strictures of their society, they feel a sudden release, as if freedom from guilt were possible and they might actually live as they choose. This is the soaring climax of all hope in the opera, later to be crushed and realities and doubts come crashing down on them both. — David Mason